Boy-Girl Differences in Parental Time Investments: Evidence from Three Countries Kevin Milligan ~ Vancouver School of Economics ~ University of British Columbia

Boy-Girl Differences in Parental Time Investments: Evidence from Three Countries

with Michael Baker.
Journal of Human Capital, Vol. 10, No. 4 (2016), pp.399-441.
Google Scholar entry.

Abstract:

We study differences in parental time investments in preschool girls and boys in Canada, the United Kingdom, and the United States.We find that parental investments in teaching activities such as reading, teaching letters, and painting favor girls over boys, starting at very young ages. We document that these boy/girl differences may be quantitatively important in explaining corresponding school-age test score gaps. We explore a parental preference explanation of these results.We find little evidence of a parental preference for girls (or boys) at young ages, which suggests that the source of the observed investment gaps may lie in production function differences or in higher costs of delivering human capital investments to boys.

Verions:

Published version, Winter 2016 here.

Updated draft, May 2014: PDF.

NBER Working Paper No. 18893, March 2013 Abstract/Paper.


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