Paul Krause, UBC, History


“Even if others are responding to your viewpoint with researched facts and deductive reasoning, the idea that they are arguing against your viewpoint in the first place means that they are challenging the very tissue of who you are.


“The alternative is the very spirit of learning itself, the thing that instructors should impart to their students and, more important, the thing that makes perpetual students of us all. The concept of ‘learning’ revolves around the admission that a person is always incomplete, open, vulnerable. The concept of ‘learning’ revolves around the admission that a person is always incomplete, open, vulnerable. To learn is to accept that one’s growth—the endless process of becoming who they will be—depends on engaging the strangeness within themselves (the part that is perpetually open, unpredictable) as much as interacting with a strange world of knowledge that they can absorb but never know in its entirety on their own….”


– Maximillian Alvarez, a graduate student at the University of Michigan


“I Think, therefore I am entitled to my opinion” – isn’t helpful


In Defense of Political Rhetoric


Aristotle’s “Rhetoric,” Book 1, Chapter 2


Argumentation in a Culture of Discord


How to Write in the Age of El Trump


On the Uses of a Liberal Education


What is University For?












“Everyone understands, implicitly and instinctively, that you have your identity first and you make up your facts after.” – Stephen Marche, writer


Is there a problem with this mode of “thought?”




“Cogito ergo sum” – Who said this? Sly or René?


 What does it mean?

“Cogito zero sum” – Why are we here?

Some provocative observations on the current state of public, and private, discourse.


JSTOR Daily
, where news meets its scholarly match


The Elements of Style, PDF